“Defund the Border Police: Racial Justice and the American Border” by Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Americans looking for a way forward in this national crisis are calling for prioritizing anti-racism, demilitarizing American society, and democratizing the political and legal system. To do so will require understanding which institutions are most in need of reform. My research on the American border suggests that border policy should be at the top of

“Answering the Call: How the Church Can Respond to the Call to Defund the Police” by Deirdre Jonese Austin

Photo by Alex Holyoake / Unsplash Growing up in the Black Church, I have been raised in a context in which call-and-response is invoked often. In call-and-response, a singer sings or a preacher issues a call, and others respond with an answer. One may greet another with “God is good all the time,” and the

“God in the Attorney-Client Relationship” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“God in the Attorney-Client Relationship” Matthew P. Cavedon I was taught early on that a criminal defense attorney has to overcome numerous obstacles to win clients’ trust. Hurdles include their past difficulties with authority figures. Their fears for the future. Their mental illnesses and chemical dependencies. The instability in their lives. Their friends and family

“COVID-19 Addendum: Experiments in Decarceration and the Courage to Rethink Commitments” by Mauricio Najarro

In recent weeks, scholars, organizers, and healthcare providers have reflected on the impact of COVID-19 on all of our lives. Social scientists and practitioners have put together online collaborations such as Medical Anthropology Weekly: COVID-19, written blog posts on disaster capitalism and carcerality, and hosted webinars such as the three-part Structural Competency & COVID-19 series.

“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion” Matthew P. Cavedon “conviction (n) 1: the act or process of finding a person guilty of a crime especially in a court of law 2a:a strong persuasion or belief” Canopy Forum is an online publication on the intersection of  law and religion, and Conviction is Canopy Forum’s ongoing

“Subsidiarity and Abolition: On the Privatization of Prisons and the Demands of Justice” by Mauricio Najarro

“Freedom” by Marko Lovric / Pixabay In October 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill meant to ban the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, phasing out existing detention facilities entirely by 2028. Already contested by means of a complaint filed by GEO Group, a private prison management corporation, and a lawsuit filed by

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part III” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the final installment of a three-part essay, offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders, given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part II” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the second part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part I” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the first part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal