“The Right to Self-Defense as the Grundnorm for Human Rights: A Response to David Little” by John Witte, Jr.

David Little has pioneered the study of religion, human rights, and religious freedom during 60 years of distinguished scholarly work at Yale, Harvard, Virginia, Georgetown, and the United States Institute of Peace. He has traced cardinal human rights principles from antiquity until today — with a special focus on the prescient contributions of Protestants, like

“The Moral Logic of Self-Defense and Identifying Rights of Urgent Moral Concern” by Christian Rice

I am grateful to have the opportunity to respond to David Little’s important essay, The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights. David’s contribution to the theoretical foundations of human rights has been of immense value. One familiar with his work knows that he has insisted for years that the drafters of

“Human Rights, Human Dignity and Personal Autonomy: A Reflection on David Little’s Theory of Self-Defense and Organic Unity” by Mark Hill QC

There are few people better placed to contribute to Canopy Forum than David Little, a leading authority on the history of religious freedom, ethics and human rights, who I first met a quarter of a century ago and whose company I have enjoyed many more times in the intervening years on both sides of the

“A Non-Theoretical Justification of Human Rights: A Response to David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense – Part II” by T. Jeremy Gunn

“Eleanor Roosevelt holding poster of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English), Lake Success, New York. November 1949.” / FDR Presidential Library & Museum 64-165 / CC BY 2.0 This is the second installment of a two-part essay responding to David Little’s analysis of self-defense as a foundation for human rights. In the first

“A Non-Theoretical Justification of Human Rights: A Response to David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense – Part I” by T. Jeremy Gunn

“Eleanor Roosevelt holding poster of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English), Lake Success, New York. November 1949.” / FDR Presidential Library & Museum 64-165 / CC BY 2.0 This is the first installment of a two-part essay responding to David Little’s analysis of self-defense as a foundation for human rights. In this first

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” by Adrienne Phillips

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” Adrienne Phillips Sudan recently criminalized female genital mutilation (FGM). According to the United Nations, about 87 percent of Sudanese women between the ages of fourteen and forty-nine have undergone some form of FGM. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that, worldwide, “more than 200 million girls and women alive today” have experienced

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part IV” by David Little

This is the final installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part III” by David Little

This is the third installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against