“Homo Religiosus in a Globalized World: How Religious Individuals are Actors of Global Law” by Giancarlo Anello

On a global level, religious institutions influence the transformations of law in a variety of ways. Many of the world’s most influential religions, such as Judaism, Islam, and Hinduism, contain their own legal systems that interact with secular state law. In addition to these larger systems that drive religious legal change, individuals inspired by religious principles

“Religious Racism: An Overlooked Form of Anti-Black Prejudice” by Danielle Boaz

Last August, DECRADI (a specialized police force in Rio de Janeiro that handles crimes of religious and racial intolerance) announced that since the beginning of 2019, Evangelized drug traffickers had threatened, invaded, deprecated or completely destroyed at least 200 hundred Afro-Brazilian religious temples (“terreiros”). In one March 2019 incident, for example, traffickers jumped over the

“Locke’s Toleration in America” by Craig Walmsley

Cover image: Portrait of John Locke by Godfrey Kneller, 1697. Wikimedia Commons. A new Locke manuscript comes to light in the United States.  Philosophers have consequences – and few have been more consequential than John Locke (1632-1704). His Essay concerning Human Understanding (1689) was the first modern statement of empiricism, ranking alongside Newton’s Principia in significance

“What’s the Story with the First U.S. Court Case on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting?” by Kristina Arriaga

United States v. Nagarwala should have marked the beginning of the end for female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in the United States. Instead, after two contentious years in court, the case unraveled when a federal judge dismissed most of the charges against the defendants. In his 28-page ruling, District Judge Bernard A. Friedman ruled that Congress had exceeded its