Canopy Forum frequently offers opportunities to engage with the wider community of law and religion scholars. In October 2020, we hosted an interdisciplinary virtual conference on Law, Religion, and Coronavirus in the United States, and in 2022, we came together to discuss Religion and Its Publics in South Asia, and the Promise and Perils of Religious Arbitration. These events are free and open to the public, and you can read and / or (re)watch these presentations below. In addition, Canopy Forum works with leading scholars to produce free, open-access, mini-courses on pressing topics. In early 2022, we partnered with Dr. Mona Siddiqui to release a six-part lecture series called Martyrs, Minorities, Faith and Fidelity: Exploring ‘Loyalty’ in Christianity and Islam. You can access these resources and more below.


January – February 2022 — Loyalty is at the center of human life – and often death. It defines families and friendships, philosophies and faiths. It also creates enemies, divides nations, and inspires people to kill and die for their country or creed. The nature and force of our loyalties to different people, ideas, and things shapes virtually every aspect of our lives. In this course, Professor Mona Siddiqui explores the polyvalent meanings of ‘loyalty’ in Christian and Islamic thought.


March 2022  This virtual conference sponsored by the Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) brought together scholars, experts and practitioners to examine key trends, practices, and problems related to arbitration tribunals in religious communities in the United States.


February 2022  This virtual interdisciplinary conference, organized by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University’s School of Law examines the relationship between the many religious traditions of South Asia and their diverse publics.


October 2020 — The purpose of this virtual conference was to provide an opportunity for thoughtful reflection on the implications for law and religion in the United States of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as the economic and racial justice crises, from our current perspectives approximately six months into the crisis.