“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: The Amber Guyger Case through the Lens of Islamic Law” by Hassaan Shahawy

This article is part of our “Religious Reflections on Forgiveness in Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Amber Guyger, a white police officer, mistakenly entered the home of Botham Jean, a black man, and shot him dead. Months later, a Texas jury convicted Guyger of murder. Some celebrated

“Jewish Justice: Guyger, Forgiveness, and Christian Love” by Michael J. Broyde

Lady of Justice Statue Under Blue Sky by Mohannad Marashdeh (Pexels cc) This article is part of our “Religious Reflections on Forgiveness in Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Nathan S. Chapman asks the right question: “How can justice and forgiveness co-exist?” This problem is one to which the Jewish

“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: Christian Reflections on the Guyger Case” by Nathan S. Chapman

Image by succo from Pixabay This article is part of our “Religious Reflections on Forgiveness in Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Americans are talking about forgiveness. Forgiveness happened where many believe it shouldn’t have, in a place, at a time, and by people who should have left it alone. Forgiveness intervened,

“Should Courts Care if a Juror Thinks She Might Burn in Hell?” by Nathaniel Romano

“Arms-Fold” by Dorset Photographic is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0  On September 12, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit granted habeas corpus relief to William Barnes, who had been previously sentenced to death in North Carolina. The basis for the court’s ruling was the fact that during deliberations at trial, a juror relied on