“Resilience During a Pandemic: What Citizens Teach Us About Faith, Policy and other Questions” by Robin Fretwell Wilson, Ruby Mendenhall, Marie-Joe Noon, Karen Simms, and Sara Buitron Viveros

On March 21, 2020, Americans became shut-ins overnight. Around 245 million people in the U.S. found themselves under stay-at-home orders. In Illinois, where we teach and work, Governor J.B. Pritzker became one of the first few governors to enforce a state-wide stay-at-home order. Following recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Pritzker

“Religiously Based Ethical Arguments Favoring Estate Taxes” by Susan Pace Hamill

Religiously Based Ethical Arguments Favoring Estate Taxes Susan Pace Hamill The federal estate tax imposes a tax on the wealth that individuals leave their heirs. This tax only applies to the very richest — well under half a percent — of all persons in the United States. Generous exemptions allow millions to be inherited without

“Human Struggle: Christian and Muslim Perspectives” by Mona Siddiqui

Human Struggle: Christian and Muslim PerspectivesMona Siddiqui In this section from chapter two of Human Struggle: Christian and Muslim Perspectives, Professor Siddiqui compares how Abu Hamid al-Ghazali and Rainer Maria Rilke wrote ‘letters’ to a younger student in which both men express their intellectual restlessness and search for faith, meaning and salvation. Abu Hamid Muhammad al-Ghazali

“The Reckoning of Religious Studies and Colonialism” by Laura Ammon

The study of religion has a long history of service to Western imperial ambitions. Recent decades have seen religious scholars wrestle with the implications of this colonial legacy for the future of the field. This essay, divided into two parts, will explore the connections between religion and colonialism. First, I will give a brief history

“Subjective Beliefs, Social Judgments, and Witch Killers” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Subjective Beliefs, Social Judgments, and Witch Killers” Matthew P. Cavedon In a 1992 abortion decision, Casey v. Planned Parenthood, a plurality of the U.S. Supreme Court held: “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life.” Consider

“Pope Francis, Fratelli tutti, and the Quest for a “Civilization of Love”” by Robert Fastiggi

On October 3, 2020, the vigil of the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, Pope Francis issued his third papal encyclical. The title, Fratelli tutti — literally meaning “all brothers” — comes from an admonition of St. Francis of Assisi (ca. 1181–1226) to his Franciscan brothers and sisters to follow a way of life marked

“Pope Francis’ Politics of Love” by Patrick Hornbeck

Pope Francis’s recent encyclical is the second of his major writings inspired directly by his papal namesake, St. Francis of Assisi. In Laudato si’, published in 2015, Pope Francis lifted up the saint’s invocation of praise for God’s presence in creation, which the pontiff memorably dubbed “our common home.” Now, in Fratelli tutti, the pope’s