“A Non-Theoretical Justification of Human Rights: A Response to David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense – Part II” by T. Jeremy Gunn

“Eleanor Roosevelt holding poster of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English), Lake Success, New York. November 1949.” / FDR Presidential Library & Museum 64-165 / CC BY 2.0 This is the second installment of a two-part essay responding to David Little’s analysis of self-defense as a foundation for human rights. In the first

“A Non-Theoretical Justification of Human Rights: A Response to David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense – Part I” by T. Jeremy Gunn

“Eleanor Roosevelt holding poster of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English), Lake Success, New York. November 1949.” / FDR Presidential Library & Museum 64-165 / CC BY 2.0 This is the first installment of a two-part essay responding to David Little’s analysis of self-defense as a foundation for human rights. In this first

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” by Adrienne Phillips

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” Adrienne Phillips Sudan recently criminalized female genital mutilation (FGM). According to the United Nations, about 87 percent of Sudanese women between the ages of fourteen and forty-nine have undergone some form of FGM. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that, worldwide, “more than 200 million girls and women alive today” have experienced

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part IV” by David Little

This is the final installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part III” by David Little

This is the third installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part II” by David Little

This is the second installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part I” by David Little

This is the first installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“Public Rhetoric, Human Nature, and Human Rights” by Mathew D. Garcia Scruggs

Natural law and human rights language is directly connected to discussions about human nature. Public rhetoric describing specific communities often shapes our discussions about the way natural law and human rights are applied to those communities. Given the current U.S. presidential administration’s public rhetoric about Latinx and undocumented communities, it is important to examine the

“Acknowledging the Moral Courage of Refugees and Responding in Kind” by Jason Grubbs

During a speech at the United Nations on September 23, 2019, President Trump stated that “protecting religious freedom is one of my highest priorities.”  This claim, however, has some advocates of threatened religious minorities crying foul. They argue that Trump has not made good on his promise, citing his ever-shrinking limit on the yearly number

“Islam and Women’s Rights: Postcolonial Challenges” by Shannon Dunn

This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s formation of the Commission on Unalienable Rights has generated controversy among human rights advocates, in part because of the possibility that