“Law, Justice, Mercy, and Forgiveness from a Catholic Perspective” by Robert Fastiggi

Photo by James Coleman on Unsplash From a Catholic perspective, law, justice, mercy, and forgiveness ultimately converge in God, who is the ultimate source of law and combines justice, mercy, and forgiveness in his dealings with human beings. The classic Catholic definition of law comes from Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274) who said that law “is nothing else than

“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: The Amber Guyger Case through the Lens of Islamic Law” by Hassaan Shahawy

Amber Guyger, a white police officer, mistakenly entered the home of Botham Jean, a black man, and shot him dead. Months later, a Texas jury convicted Guyger of murder. Some celebrated the rare verdict, while others protested that Guyger’s 10-year sentence was too lenient. However, the case became even more controversial for two unconventional courtroom

“Jewish Justice: Guyger, Forgiveness, and Christian Love” by Michael J. Broyde

Nathan S. Chapman asks the right question: “How can justice and forgiveness co-exist?” This problem is one to which the Jewish tradition has offered at least three different answers. None of these responses, however, focus on the deeply Christian idea of God’s love for us.  On Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement, when according to rabbinic teachings Jews

“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: Christian Reflections on the Guyger Case” by Nathan S. Chapman

Americans are talking about forgiveness. Forgiveness happened where many believe it shouldn’t have, in a place, at a time, and by people who should have left it alone. Forgiveness intervened, as it so often does, when what was demanded was justice—long-delayed, long-awaited, grueling justice. How can justice and forgiveness co-exist? This question is raised sharply by

“Islam and Women’s Rights: Postcolonial Challenges” by Shannon Dunn

This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s formation of the Commission on Unalienable Rights has generated controversy among human rights advocates, in part because of the possibility that

“A Natural Law for Queer and Racial Justice” by Craig Ford

Image by Robert Jones from Pixabay This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. In this brief essay, I propose that the natural law and social justice traditions can together form a powerful partnership that champions anti-racist, anti-sexist, and anti-homophobic causes.

“Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Nonhuman Environment” by Dana Lloyd

Cover Image: Mouth of the Klamath River on the Pacific Ocean, Del Norte County, California / Wikimedia. This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. The Trump Administration’s new Commission on Unalienable Rights, recently convened

“The Many Voices of Human Rights” by Linda Hogan

Miquel Barceló’s ceiling at the UN headquarters in Geneva. United States Mission Geneva / CC BY-ND 2.0 This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. The Commission on Unalienable Rights has already generated significant criticism,

“A Natural Law Basis for Human Rights?” by Hans-Martien ten Napel

This essay is the first in a series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. Attempts by the United States State Department’s Commission on Unalienable Rights to identify a subset of proper “unalienable rights” within the broader category of