Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Canopy Forum is a digital publication from the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University that produces and delivers expert analysis to the broader community of digital consumers: citizens, scholars, lawyers, clergy, journalists, policy makers, and more.

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Video Archive

Video Archive

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University holds conferences and events that draw thousands of participants from the far corners of the world. Explore recorded versions of our esteemed speakers here!

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Reflecting on COVID-19

Reflecting on COVID-19

In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, Canopy Forum continues our commitment to produce expert analysis for the broader community of digital consumers: citizens, scholars, lawyers, clergy, journalists, policy makers, and more. We've collected our recent content reflecting on the current public health crisis.

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“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion”Matthew P. Cavedon “conviction (n) 1: the act or process of finding a person guilty of a crime especially in a court of law 2a:a strong persuasion or belief” Canopy Forum is an online publication on the intersection of  law and religion, and Conviction is Canopy Forum’s ongoing series

“Subsidiarity and Abolition: On the Privatization of Prisons and the Demands of Justice” by Mauricio Najarro

“Freedom” by Marko Lovric / Pixabay In October 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill meant to ban the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, phasing out existing detention facilities entirely by 2028. Already contested by means of a complaint filed by GEO Group, a private prison management corporation, and a lawsuit filed by

“COVID-19: Why the Balance Between Freedom of Religion and Public Health Matters” by Paul T. Babie & Charles J. Russo

As COVID-19 tightens its lethal grip on the globe, a palpable tension emerges between the authority of governmental officials in every state in the U.S. who have issued guidelines limiting social interactions to preserve the public health while recognizing religious exemptions, and individual rights to freedom of religion. Lawsuits in the United States have challenged

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part III” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the final installment of a three-part essay, offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders, given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part II” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the second part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part I” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the first part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

REVIEW: ‘Dar al-Islam Revisited: Territoriality in Contemporary Islamic Legal Discourse on Muslims in the West’ by Sarah Albrecht

Albrecht begins her very fine study with a methodological introduction, a summary of the various pre-modern views of territoriality in Islam, and an overview of various Islamic views on territoriality in the modern period. Part Two, the modern period, is the main focus of her work. There, Albrecht distinguishes four typologies for understanding the geo-religious

“Human Rights and Christian Ethics: Finding Convergence in Response to Communicable Infections” by Israel Chukwuka Okunwaye

In a 2016 article in the American Journal of Law and Medicine, George Annas developed four guiding principles, which he argued could helpfully chart a broad health and human rights response to the spread of infections that threaten public safety. First, he suggested that prevention should be the primary goal when formulating public policy responses

“Religious Freedom and Subsidiarity in the Coronavirus Pandemic” by M. Christian Green

Congressman Clay Higgins, representing Louisiana’s Third Congressional District, recently drew attention for his response to the COVID-19 pandemic. First, the congressman addressed a letter to Louisiana’s Governor John Bel Edwards decrying and denouncing restrictions on group gatherings as a violation of freedoms of religion and assembly under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Then,