Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Canopy Forum is a digital publication from the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University that produces and delivers expert analysis to the broader community of digital consumers: citizens, scholars, lawyers, clergy, journalists, policy makers, and more.

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CSLR Talks

CSLR Talks

CSLR Talks make innovative, interdisciplinary scholarship accessible to the public. Canopy Forum provides opportunities for emerging and established scholars in the field(s) of law and religion, broadly defined, to present their research in a TED-talk style format.

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Video Archive

Video Archive

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University holds conferences and events that draw thousands of participants from the far corners of the world. Explore recorded versions of our esteemed speakers here!

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“Law, Justice, Mercy, and Forgiveness from a Catholic Perspective” by Robert Fastiggi

Photo by James Coleman on Unsplash From a Catholic perspective, law, justice, mercy, and forgiveness ultimately converge in God, who is the ultimate source of law and combines justice, mercy, and forgiveness in his dealings with human beings. The classic Catholic definition of law comes from Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274) who said that law “is nothing else than

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 2)” by Shlomo C. Pill

Parliament of the World’s Religions, Chicago, United States, 1893. Wikimedia. Part two of this three-part series on interfaith dialogue explains several different forms of interfaith dialogue, highlighting some of the benefits and limitations of each, and explores the relevance of religious and interfaith literacy as an important tool for effective interfaith dialogue. [Read Part I here]

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 1)” by Shlomo C. Pill

This is the first part of a three-part series exploring some of the methods, possibilities, and skills needed to effectively engage in interfaith dialogue and activity. History of Interfaith Engagement Interfaith engagement is hardly a new phenomenon. The most basic kind of interfaith activity—what is often referred to as “the dialogue of everyday life”—has been

“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: The Amber Guyger Case through the Lens of Islamic Law” by Hassaan Shahawy

Amber Guyger, a white police officer, mistakenly entered the home of Botham Jean, a black man, and shot him dead. Months later, a Texas jury convicted Guyger of murder. Some celebrated the rare verdict, while others protested that Guyger’s 10-year sentence was too lenient. However, the case became even more controversial for two unconventional courtroom

“Judgment and Forgiveness in Texas: Christian Reflections on the Guyger Case” by Nathan S. Chapman

Americans are talking about forgiveness. Forgiveness happened where many believe it shouldn’t have, in a place, at a time, and by people who should have left it alone. Forgiveness intervened, as it so often does, when what was demanded was justice—long-delayed, long-awaited, grueling justice. How can justice and forgiveness co-exist? This question is raised sharply by

“Equality or Need: A Theological Look at the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Tax Plans (Part 3)” by Allen Calhoun

—Part III—  Parts I and II of this article surveyed the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates’ tax proposals, particularly those (like the wealth tax proposals) that seek to reduce economic inequality, and located those proposals in the history of tax philosophy. This Part III places that largely post-Enlightenment philosophy of taxation in dialogue with the longer

“Equality or Need: A Theological Look at the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Tax Plans (Part 2)” by Allen Calhoun

—Part II—  Part I of this article surveyed the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates’ tax plans and situated proposals for raising revenue and reducing the wealth gap in broader tax policy concerns. The proposals are revisiting two questions dormant since the early 1980s: (1) how should tax policy balance the dual concerns of equity and efficiency;