“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part III” by David Little

This is the third installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part II” by David Little

This is the second installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part I” by David Little

This is the first installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“COVID-19 Addendum: Experiments in Decarceration and the Courage to Rethink Commitments” by Mauricio Najarro

In recent weeks, scholars, organizers, and healthcare providers have reflected on the impact of COVID-19 on all of our lives. Social scientists and practitioners have put together online collaborations such as Medical Anthropology Weekly: COVID-19, written blog posts on disaster capitalism and carcerality, and hosted webinars such as the three-part Structural Competency & COVID-19 series.

“COVID-19: Why the Balance Between Freedom of Religion and Public Health Matters” by Paul T. Babie & Charles J. Russo

As COVID-19 tightens its lethal grip on the globe, a palpable tension emerges between the authority of governmental officials in every state in the U.S. who have issued guidelines limiting social interactions to preserve the public health while recognizing religious exemptions, and individual rights to freedom of religion. Lawsuits in the United States have challenged

“Human Rights and Christian Ethics: Finding Convergence in Response to Communicable Infections” by Israel Chukwuka Okunwaye

In a 2016 article in the American Journal of Law and Medicine, George Annas developed four guiding principles, which he argued could helpfully chart a broad health and human rights response to the spread of infections that threaten public safety. First, he suggested that prevention should be the primary goal when formulating public policy responses

“Religious Freedom and Subsidiarity in the Coronavirus Pandemic” by M. Christian Green

Congressman Clay Higgins, representing Louisiana’s Third Congressional District, recently drew attention for his response to the COVID-19 pandemic. First, the congressman addressed a letter to Louisiana’s Governor John Bel Edwards decrying and denouncing restrictions on group gatherings as a violation of freedoms of religion and assembly under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Then,

“Pandemic Monitoring Without Scapegoating: Lessons from the Shincheonji Community of South Korea” by Massimo Introvigne

An earlier version of this essay was published here, on Diresom. On February 19, 2020, I received the first of many phone calls from the media about a new South Korean religious movement known as the Shincheonji Church of Jesus, which was somewhat related to the spread of COVID-19 in the country. I was the

“Re-centering the Religious Freedom v. Public Health Debate” by Faraz Sanei

The devastation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic has heightened concerns among human rights advocates that governments will use their police powers to suspend or severely curb fundamental rights in the name of public health, welfare, and safety. One of these rights is the freedom of religion or belief, which interacts with — and is sometimes