“General Applicability: An Ambiguous Concept after Fulton” by Patrick Hornbeck

What does it mean to call a law generally applicable? The question is timely because of a confluence between the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision this summer in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia and ongoing litigation over COVID-19 prevention measures, especially vaccination mandates. In Fulton, the Court gestured toward two definitions of general applicability. The majority

Beekeeping on the Sussex Downs: Philip Reynolds Reflects on Retirement, Happiness, and Echo Chambers

In the Fall of 2021, Dr. Philip L. Reynolds – a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Medieval Christianity, and Aquinas Professor of Historical Theology at Candler School of Theology – retired. For almost four decades, Reynolds has taught and published extensively in the

“Law Without Gospel: Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance, Part Two” by Laura Ford

This is Part II of Laura Ford’s essay on Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance. The First Amendment Balance & Social Peace In a careful historical study of American cultural and jurisprudential developments relating to First Amendment religious freedom, Philip Hamburger has persuasively argued that the U.S. effort to separate religion from politics

“Law Without Gospel: Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance, Part One” by Laura Ford

This is the final remnant of the Christianity of their ancestors, the last enduring bit of their inheritance: a social gospel, without the gospel. – Joseph Bottum, An Anxious Age (2014) The law commands and requires us to do certain things. The law is thus directed to our behavior and consists in making requirements. For God

“Law and Christianity in Latin America: The Work of Great Jurists” edited by M.C. Mirow and Rafael Domingo

Law and Christianity in Latin America: The Work of Great Jurists edited by M.C. Mirow and Rafael Domingo This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History, “presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the

“Vermeule’s Society and Its Enemies” by Aaron J. Walayat

When Harvard law professor Adrian Vermeule published his article “Beyond Originalism” in The Atlantic last year, his critics saw it as a moment of revelation. The legal right, after decades of hiding behind the mask of proceduralism, had finally reared its true, authoritarian face. Criticism of the article, however, interprets Vermeule as calling for judges

“Seeking a Sovereign for the End of Democracy: Monarchism and the Far Right” by Sarah Riccardi-Swartz

“Well, I personally think we should scrap the constitution,” current congressional candidate Michael Sisco proclaimed in December 2020 during an episode of his podcast The Michael Sisco Show. During that same episode, titled “The Republic is a Deception,” Sisco mentioned that he favors a form of Byzantine symphonia “where the church has authority over the

“Disgust and Discrimination in Tehran” by Kristina Arriaga

Offering a cup of tea to a stranger is universally viewed as an act of hospitality. Except if you are a Baha’i in Iran, where this kindness can result in torture, imprisonment, or death, both for the offeror and the recipient. The danger springs from the recent escalation of a government-led propaganda campaign meant to instigate hatred against the Baha’is, whose religion,