“The Right to Self-Defense as the Grundnorm for Human Rights: A Response to David Little” by John Witte, Jr.

David Little has pioneered the study of religion, human rights, and religious freedom during 60 years of distinguished scholarly work at Yale, Harvard, Virginia, Georgetown, and the United States Institute of Peace. He has traced cardinal human rights principles from antiquity until today — with a special focus on the prescient contributions of Protestants, like

“Non-Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation” by Johan D. van der Vyver

The judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Bostock v. Clayton County, decided on June 15, 2020, is, to say the least, quite controversial. It relates to non-discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment practices and has been applauded by many who champion the legal protection of homosexual and transgender individuals. The

“Christianity and Criminal Law” An Introduction by Mark Hill QC

Christianity and Criminal Law edited by Mark Hill QC, Norman Doe, R.H. Helmholz, and John Witte, Jr. This volume is one of several new introductions to Christianity and Law commissioned by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University. Each volume in the series is an anthology of some two dozen chapters written by leading scholars

“Is there a Right to Healthcare? Towards a Comprehensive Jewish Approach” by Jason Weiner

The question of the “right” to fair, universal and comprehensive healthcare has been circulating for quite a while, but rapid expansion of modern medical technology has transformed the question from a periodic issue into a perennial one. Controlling rising costs, determining priorities, and ensuring fair distribution and access to healthcare are central questions now that

“Polygamy in a Time of Pandemic: Hard Times Ahead” by Nurul Huda Mohd. Razif

Mount Kinabalu, Malaysia / photo by CEphoto, Uwe Aranas / CC-BY-SA-3.0 As we transition into the month of June, Malaysia enters the twelfth week of its government-enforced Movement Control Order (MCO), which put its population of 32 million people under a swift and strict lockdown to contain the spread of CoVid-19. Almost overnight, offices and

“The Moral Logic of Self-Defense and Identifying Rights of Urgent Moral Concern” by Christian Rice

I am grateful to have the opportunity to respond to David Little’s important essay, The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights. David’s contribution to the theoretical foundations of human rights has been of immense value. One familiar with his work knows that he has insisted for years that the drafters of

“God in the Attorney-Client Relationship” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“God in the Attorney-Client Relationship” Matthew P. Cavedon I was taught early on that a criminal defense attorney has to overcome numerous obstacles to win clients’ trust. Hurdles include their past difficulties with authority figures. Their fears for the future. Their mental illnesses and chemical dependencies. The instability in their lives. Their friends and family

“Christianity and Global Law” edited by Rafael Domingo and John Witte, Jr.

Christianity and Global Lawedited by Rafael Domingo and John Witte Jr. This volume is one of several new introductions to Christianity and Law commissioned by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University. Each volume is an anthology of some two dozen chapters written by leading scholars. The volumes contain historical,

“Human Rights, Human Dignity and Personal Autonomy: A Reflection on David Little’s Theory of Self-Defense and Organic Unity” by Mark Hill QC

There are few people better placed to contribute to Canopy Forum than David Little, a leading authority on the history of religious freedom, ethics and human rights, who I first met a quarter of a century ago and whose company I have enjoyed many more times in the intervening years on both sides of the

“Why Do White Christians in America Think They Are Persecuted?” by John Corrigan

Over the last decade, the internet has been abuzz with complaints from white American Christians that they are the victims of a broad secularist and leftist persecution. Stung by the decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, bewildered by demographic research demonstrating their new minority status, and ever more desperately aligning their Christianity with an indignant populist