“Tax Law, Religion, and Justice: An Exploration of Theological Reflections on Taxation” by Allen Calhoun

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“Reconciling Retribution and Rehabilitation” by Matthew P. Cavedon

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“Law and the Christian Tradition in Scandinavia” edited by Kjell Å Modéer and Helle Vogt

Law and the Christian Tradition in Scandinavia: The Writings of Great Nordic Jurists edited by Kjell Å Modéer and Helle Vogt This volume is part of a 50-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History,” presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia.

“Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Overly Broad Take on Judges and the Death Penalty” by Matthew P. Cavedon

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“Religion and the Presidential Election” by Steven K. Green

It has been ten presidential election cycles since Ronald Reagan defeated the nation’s most religiously devout president, Jimmy Carter, a feat he accomplished with the overwhelming support of conservative Christian voters. The preceding year (1979) had witnessed the rise of the “Moral Majority” and the Religious Right, and Reagan’s election apparently cemented the relationship between

“The Coronavirus, the Compelling State Interest in Health, and Religious Autonomy” by W. Cole Durham, Jr.

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section A. Constitutional Law (Jane Wise, moderator) “The Coronavirus, the Compelling

“Through the Eyes of James Cone: COVID-19, Police Brutality, and The Black Church” by George Walters-Sleyon

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section E. Theological Implications/Reflections (Stephanie Barclay, moderator) “Through the Eyes of

“COVID and Egalitarian Catholic Women’s Movements” by Mary Anne Case

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section D. Religious Organizations (Mark Movsesian, moderator) “COVID and Egalitarian Catholic