“Plessy, Prince, and Me: Law, Religion, and the Quest for Racial Justice” by M. Christian Green

1896. The year seemed to flash in glaring red lights from the text of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Plessy v. Ferguson decision as I was preparing my next lecture for “Law, Religion, and Social Change,” a course that I was teaching at Harvard Divinity School in the fall of 2005. The course was intended to

“How Is Eastern Christianity Affecting Pope Francis’s Priorities?” by Matthew Cavedon

Introduction: Easter with the Easterns? The Christmas season hadn’t even begun when Pope Francis announced a potential change to future Easters: if Eastern Christians unite around a single date for celebrating the holiday, he said, Catholics will adjust their calendars accordingly. This might be mistaken for a minor scheduling matter, but it reflects a key

“Comparing the Two Major Courts Systems in Europe on the Matter of Religious Dress” by James Richardson

“Towers of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) after fifth extension, January 2020” by Laurent Verdier / Wikimedia This article is part of our “Clothed in Religion: Law and Religious Attire/Garb” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. There are two major judicial systems currently operating within the

Does Clothing Make the Person: Reflections of the Rights of Public School Employees to Wear Religious Garb in the Workplace By Allan G. Osborne and Charles J. Russo

This article is part of our “Clothed in Religion: Law and Religious Attire/Garb” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Introduction In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Polonius famously muses that “the apparel oft proclaims the man.” Yet, in today’s increasingly religiously diverse (and religiously unaffiliated) American society wherein about 30% are religiously

Does Religion Speak War; Why Use It As A Means? By Rackel Jackson Agara

“War is the greatest plague that afflicts humanity, it destroys states, it destroys families, and even religion…Any scourge is preferable to it,” observed Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Many people in the world have used religion to instigate violent conflicts but these religious roots of conflict are often disregarded. A perennial question that has arisen throughout

“The Blessings of Liberty: Human Rights and Religious Freedom in the Western Legal Tradition” by John Witte Jr.

The Blessings of Liberty: Human Rights and Religious Freedom in the Western Legal TraditionJohn Witte, Jr. The following is excerpted from John Witte, Jr.’s The Blessings of Liberty: Human Rights and Religious Freedom in the Western Legal Tradition, out now from Cambridge University Press. Read Nicholas Wolterstorff’s review of the book here. For the past

“Minorities and Religious Attire in Europe: The Data of The Atlas of Religious or Belief Minority Rights” by Silvio Ferrari

This article is part of our “Clothed in Religion: Law and Religious Attire/Garb” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. The issue of religious attire is like a strong wind that suddenly arose some 20 years ago and blew across Europe for a long time. Now that the force of

“Sovereigns, Exceptions, and ‘Shadow Dockets’: Law, Religion, and States of Emergency” by M. Christian Green

“Sovereign is he who decides on the exception.”Carl Schmitt, Political Theology (1921)  “By nonetheless granting relief, the Court goes astray. . . . That renders the Court’s emergency docket not for emergencies at all.”Justice Elena Kagan, Louisiana v. American Rivers (2022) Hitler’s Lawyer About a decade ago, the name of a particular twentieth-century political theorist

“Acarajé, Religious Attire, and Conflict in Brazil” by Danielle Boaz

 Baianas de Acarajé / October 18, 2007 / Wikimedia Commons This article is part of our “Clothed in Religion: Law and Religious Attire/Garb” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. The government of Brazil has widely recognized and protected acarajé — a food that originates from Candomblé (an Afro-Brazilian religion), as