“Church Autonomy and the corpus mysticum Tradition” by Edward A. David

Churches can be forgiven for describing themselves, like any other civil society organization, as “voluntary.” This Lockean portrayal, after all, dominates the American political imagination. But an exclusive or even primary emphasis upon the freely choosing individual should give churches pause. Does not Saint Paul describe each member in more corporate terms, as together making

“Why do restrictions on religious attendance cause ‘irreparable harm’? A Catholic reflection on Diocese of Brooklyn v. Cuomo”

In Diocese of Brooklyn v. Cuomo (2020), the U.S. Supreme Court held that New York’s religious-attendance restrictions “would lead to irreparable injury” to religious communities and, if enjoined or rejected, “would not harm the public interest.” While the decision largely focused on the state’s unequal treatment of religion, the Court’s brief remarks concerning harm and

“Extracting Our Abstractions: Why We Need a Christian Approach to Corporate Religious Liberty” by Edward A. David

A Christian Approach to Corporate Religious LibertyEdward A. David Extracting Our Abstractions: Why We Need a Christian Approach to Corporate Religious LibertyAn Introduction by Edward A. David Pointing to the polarization that surrounds disputes like Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. (2014), A Christian Approach to Corporate Religious Liberty argues that such cases need not involve