“Law Without Gospel: Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance, Part Two” by Laura Ford

This is Part II of Laura Ford’s essay on Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance. The First Amendment Balance & Social Peace In a careful historical study of American cultural and jurisprudential developments relating to First Amendment religious freedom, Philip Hamburger has persuasively argued that the U.S. effort to separate religion from politics

“Law Without Gospel: Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance, Part One” by Laura Ford

This is the final remnant of the Christianity of their ancestors, the last enduring bit of their inheritance: a social gospel, without the gospel. – Joseph Bottum, An Anxious Age (2014) The law commands and requires us to do certain things. The law is thus directed to our behavior and consists in making requirements. For God

“The EU Needs an RFRA: The Leftovers of Religious Freedom in the Case Law of the Court of Justice” by Andrea Pin

Recently, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) passed a new ruling on the Muslim headscarf. That headscarves cause debate shouldn’t be a surprise. Four years ago, the CJEU dealt with the very same issue: private employers asking Muslim women to remove their headscarves and Muslim women claiming the violation of Directive 2000/78 EC,

“Stop Accusing Religious Conservatives of ‘Using’ Religion” by Raphael A. Friedman

Identifying proper boundaries for religious liberty in American public life continues to be a hot-button issue. Stories of friction between religious groups and other members of society have pervaded the headlines, and such conflicts aren’t going away anytime soon.  Over the last few years, the Supreme Court has ruled on a number of cases in

“The European Margin of Dis-Appreciation and the Big No to Ritual Slaughter” by Sohail Wahedi

Religious traditions that are not historically rooted in the Christo-European culture face particular legal and political challenges that are unprecedented in the post-World War II-era. Despite the establishment of supranational bodies responsible for the promotion of human rights standards and the advancement of civil liberties, liberal democracies have failed to introduce and maintain a robust

“The Corpus Mysticum and Church Freedom: A Response to Edward David” by James Pennell

De Vries, Paul Vredeman. “Interior of a Gothic Cathedral,” 1612. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, https://collections.lacma.org/node/229641. This article is in response to Edward David’s recent article in Canopy. From a theological perspective, Christians should welcome Edward David’s critical reflections on Lockean liberalism’s eschewal of a corporate understanding of the Church as corpus mysticum. For

“Why Corporate Religious Exemptions Are Not Corporate Social Responsibility” by Elizabeth Sepper and James D. Nelson

In academic and legal debates, we frequently hear that the tradition of corporate social responsibility (CSR) supports religious exemptions for business corporations. As Justice Alito wrote in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, if corporations may pursue various socially responsible objectives — such as adhering to strict environmental standards or providing exemplary working conditions — then “there

“Church Autonomy and the corpus mysticum Tradition” by Edward A. David

Churches can be forgiven for describing themselves, like any other civil society organization, as “voluntary.” This Lockean portrayal, after all, dominates the American political imagination. But an exclusive or even primary emphasis upon the freely choosing individual should give churches pause. Does not Saint Paul describe each member in more corporate terms, as together making

“Religious Freedom in Pandemic Times in Europe: A Perspective After One Year” by Alejandro González-Varas

1. Introduction Coronavirus began to spread across the world a year ago, peaking in most EU countries (as well as the United Kingdom) in April or early May 2020. While the amount of COVID transmissions was quite lower in summer than in spring, from this moment on, its intensity has been variable. Legal continence measures

“Australian Jurists and Christianity” by Geoff Lindsay and Wayne Hudson

Australian Jurists and ChristianityGeoff Lindsay and Wayne Hudson An Overview by Geoff Lindsay and Wayne Hudson This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History”, presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the Center for