Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Canopy Forum is a digital publication from the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University that produces and delivers expert analysis to the broader community of digital consumers: citizens, scholars, lawyers, clergy, journalists, policy makers, and more.

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Video Archive

Video Archive

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University holds conferences and events that draw thousands of participants from the far corners of the world. Explore recorded versions of our esteemed speakers here!

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Virtual Conference

Virtual Conference

Twenty-five leading scholars offer thoughtful reflection on the implications for law and religion in the United States of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as the economic and racial justice crises, from our current perspectives approximately six months into the crisis.

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“Practicing (and) Catholic” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Practicing (and) Catholic” Matthew P. Cavedon Sai Santosh Kumar Kolluru recently reflected for Canopy Forum on how Hindu beliefs and practices inform his service as a lawyer. His writing inspired me to put down some thoughts on the relationship between Catholic theology and my own practice as a criminal defense attorney. In certain ways, this

“What We Owe the Democracy: Martin Luther King, Jr., the Right to Vote, and the Call to Civic Duty” by Atiba R. Ellis

The right to vote is a contested concept in American society. The choices made by elected federal and state governments, on the behalf of “We the People” as to who is not included in our democracy both construct American citizenship and reflect American democratic values. The contest around the right to vote, called “the voting

“How the Divisive Nature of Religion Could Unify our Divided Politics” by Mingyu Jun

In the 2016 presidential election, 81% of white evangelical Christians voted for the GOP candidate Donald Trump, while only 16% gave their votes to Hilary Clinton.This significant margin has the potential to grow further in the 2020 election with the voting polls indicating that 82% of evangelicals would vote for Trump over Biden. To close

“Trump, Biden, and Religious Claims in a Secular Space” by John E. King

“USA Bible” by Pastor Robert / Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0 At a campaign event in early August 2020, President Trump made statements about his Democratic rival for the presidency, Joe Biden, that went beyond his typically disparaging remarks about Biden’s policies, cognitive abilities, or political record. Instead, Trump’s comments were decidedly religious. Trump informed

“Free Speakers, Restrained Hearers: Blasphemy’s Legal Evolution” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Free Speakers, Restrained Hearers: Blasphemy’s Legal Evolution“ Matthew P. Cavedon The most infamous terror trial in modern France began in September. Five years ago, Islamist terrorists shot nearly two dozen people at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical magazine. The publication had drawn their ire by reprinting twelve cartoons of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad that

“Tax Law, Religion, and Justice: An Exploration of Theological Reflections on Taxation” by Allen Calhoun

Tax Law, Religion, and Justice: An Exploration of Theological Reflections on TaxationAllen Calhoun An Introduction by Allen Calhoun This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter forthcoming from Routledge/CRC Press in Tax Law, Religion, and Justice: An Exploration of Theological Reflections on Taxation on March 8, 2021, available online here. Why does the institution of taxation occupy

“Reconciling Retribution and Rehabilitation” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Reconciling Retribution and Rehabilitation” Matthew P. Cavedon Ten-year-old Shane Paul O’Doherty pledged to “fight and if necessary die for Ireland’s freedom.” By the time he was 18, he had joined the Irish Republican Army and “developed the letter bomb” after reading about its use by the Palestinian Liberation Organization. For two years, he “bombed Derry