Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Canopy Forum is a digital publication from the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University that produces and delivers expert analysis to the broader community of digital consumers: citizens, scholars, lawyers, clergy, journalists, policy makers, and more.

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Video Archive

Video Archive

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University holds conferences and events that draw thousands of participants from the far corners of the world. Explore recorded versions of our esteemed speakers here!

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Most Popular

Most Popular

Browse some of Canopy Forum's most popular posts over the past few months, and read the top 10 posts of 2020!

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“Barth and Bonhoeffer: Saviors of Democracy?” by Adam McDuffie

From his very first line, Joshua Mauldin establishes immediately what is at stake in his new thought-provoking volume Barth, Bonhoeffer, & Modern Politics: “Modern democracy is in crisis.” The modern liberal democratic project does seem to teeter perpetually on a knife’s edge. Critics and prognosticators routinely predict its demise. While there has been no shortage

“Yes and No: Barth, Bonhoeffer, and Modern Politics” by Elisabeth Rain Kincaid

Beloved author J.R.R. Tolkien survived the First World War’s trenches, confronted the intellectual challenges and questions of modernity, and then wrote his epic works of high fantasy, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, during the horrors of the Second World War. After the perils and high heroic deeds of their quest to destroy

“Border Work: Review of ‘At Home and Abroad: The Politics of American Religion'” by Brent Nongbri

It’s no secret that tensions exist in the ways that the government of the United States treats “religion” in different contexts. In the domestic sphere, private corporations can, as of 2014, essentially opt out of obeying the laws they deem incompatible with their “sincerely held religious beliefs.” Yet in terms of foreign policy, the same

“The Theological and the Political in Christianity, Socialism, and Modernity” by Gary Dorrien

Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer were theological titans of the twentieth century who naturally wrote mostly about the interpretation of Christian doctrines. That they remain relevant to social ethics and political theology cannot be assumed; such a claim must be defended. Both theologians might seem to be prime candidates for the verdict that too much

“Public Health, Public Trust, and Faith Communities” by Michael J. DeBoer

In a recently issued report, the RAND Corporation highlighted a dimension of the impact that the government response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had on trust. It noted that trust in the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) declined significantly between May and October 2020, and it observed that

“Stop Accusing Religious Conservatives of ‘Using’ Religion” by Raphael A. Friedman

Identifying proper boundaries for religious liberty in American public life continues to be a hot-button issue. Stories of friction between religious groups and other members of society have pervaded the headlines, and such conflicts aren’t going away anytime soon.  Over the last few years, the Supreme Court has ruled on a number of cases in

“At Home and Among ‘Heathens'” by Matthew J. Cressler

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Winnifred Fallers Sullivan open their edited volume At Home and Abroad: The Politics of American Religion (Columbia University Press, 2020) with an epigraph: Is it, perhaps, possible that there are two kinds of Civilization—one for home consumption and one for the heathen market? – Mark Twain, “To the Person Sitting in Darkness”