Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Welcome to Canopy Forum!

Canopy Forum is a digital publication from the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University. Our contributors deliver expert analysis on important issues of law and religion around the world.

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Video Archive

Video Archive

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University holds conferences and events that draw thousands of participants from the far corners of the world. Explore recorded versions of our esteemed speakers here!

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Most Popular

Most Popular

Browse some of Canopy Forum's most popular posts over the past few months, and read the top 10 posts of 2020!

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“Framing Tax Enforcement Against the Poor Through Catholic Social Teaching” by W. Edward Afield

Framing Tax Enforcement Against the Poor Through Catholic Social Teaching W. Edward Afield What makes for just tax policy? As Professor Hamill observes in her Canopy Forum piece on the estate tax, tax policy “is ultimately a justice-based ethical issue” that naturally connects to the values underlying a citizen’s perception of justice. Law and religion

“Ecce Homo: Pilate and Jesus in the History of Secularity” by David Lloyd Dusenbury

The Innocence of Pontius Pilate by David Lloyd Dusenbury An overview by the author, with parts adapted from the book, published with the permission of Hurst and Oxford University Press. Ecce Homo: Pilate and Jesus in the History of Secularity In a beautiful volume of lectures and conversations, Julia Kristeva suggests that “the ‘genius of

“Religious Liberty and Social Equality in the Aftermath of Fulton v. Philadelphia” by Kenneth Townsend

Religion clause jurisprudence is one of the more convoluted areas of constitutional law. The Supreme Court has articulated at least six different standards in recent years for determining whether a state has violated the First Amendment’s prohibition against “establishment of religion.”  The Court’s approach to free exercise cases is not much clearer and no less

“The Qur’an, Islamic Veiling, and Laïcité: French Law and Islamophobia” by James McBride

In the summer of 2021, the French National Assembly and Senate passed the so-called “anti-separatism” bill, signed into law by Emanuel Macron, ostensibly to protect laïcité, the French secularist doctrine designed to ensure government neutrality toward religion. The new law increases scrutiny by the government of religious associations, bars homeschooling (except in some instances which

“General Applicability: An Ambiguous Concept after Fulton” by Patrick Hornbeck

What does it mean to call a law generally applicable? The question is timely because of a confluence between the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision this summer in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia and ongoing litigation over COVID-19 prevention measures, especially vaccination mandates. In Fulton, the Court gestured toward two definitions of general applicability. The majority

Beekeeping on the Sussex Downs: Philip Reynolds Reflects on Retirement, Happiness, and Echo Chambers

In the Fall of 2021, Dr. Philip L. Reynolds – a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Medieval Christianity, and Aquinas Professor of Historical Theology at Candler School of Theology – retired. For almost four decades, Reynolds has taught and published extensively in the

“Law Without Gospel: Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance, Part Two” by Laura Ford

This is Part II of Laura Ford’s essay on Social Identity Pietism and the First Amendment Balance. The First Amendment Balance & Social Peace In a careful historical study of American cultural and jurisprudential developments relating to First Amendment religious freedom, Philip Hamburger has persuasively argued that the U.S. effort to separate religion from politics