“Free as F*ck: Kyle Rittenhouse, Whiteness, and a Divinely-Ordained Order to Kill” by Robert P. Jones

Today the news broke that Kyle Rittenhouse had been “acquitted on all charges in the shooting deaths of two men and wounding of a third at a Wisconsin protest against racial injustice last year,” as AP put it.  I don’t say this glibly: God help us.  Rittenhouse, as we would say growing up, was clearly “looking for

“A Russian Conception of Legal Consciousness” by Randall A. Poole

Law and the Christian Tradition in Modern Russia edited by Paul Valliere and Randall A. Poole This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History,” presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the Center for

“Vermeule’s Society and Its Enemies” by Aaron J. Walayat

When Harvard law professor Adrian Vermeule published his article “Beyond Originalism” in The Atlantic last year, his critics saw it as a moment of revelation. The legal right, after decades of hiding behind the mask of proceduralism, had finally reared its true, authoritarian face. Criticism of the article, however, interprets Vermeule as calling for judges

“Seeking a Sovereign for the End of Democracy: Monarchism and the Far Right” by Sarah Riccardi-Swartz

“Well, I personally think we should scrap the constitution,” current congressional candidate Michael Sisco proclaimed in December 2020 during an episode of his podcast The Michael Sisco Show. During that same episode, titled “The Republic is a Deception,” Sisco mentioned that he favors a form of Byzantine symphonia “where the church has authority over the

“Disgust and Discrimination in Tehran” by Kristina Arriaga

Offering a cup of tea to a stranger is universally viewed as an act of hospitality. Except if you are a Baha’i in Iran, where this kindness can result in torture, imprisonment, or death, both for the offeror and the recipient. The danger springs from the recent escalation of a government-led propaganda campaign meant to instigate hatred against the Baha’is, whose religion,

“Moving Beyond Hypocrisy: Review of ‘At Home and Abroad'” by Jennifer Graber

In this volume about the politics of American religion, Shakman Hurd and Sullivan ask readers to consider the differences between “domestic versions of religion and religious freedom” as opposed to “those offered for export” (1). The emphasis on disestablishment and free exercise at home, they write, stands in stark contrast to American projects abroad, where

“Religion, Law, and the Redoubling of Ideas” by Colby Dickinson

I. According to their nature, ideas, as purely abstract concepts, are radical intrusions into material existence. They are that which drive us to re-examine and potentially upend our lives on the basis of wholly immaterial considerations. Though there may be both conscious and unconscious gains made for a person’s existence through the implementation of particular