“A Non-Theoretical Justification of Human Rights: A Response to David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense – Part I” by T. Jeremy Gunn

“Eleanor Roosevelt holding poster of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English), Lake Success, New York. November 1949.” / FDR Presidential Library & Museum 64-165 / CC BY 2.0 This is the first installment of a two-part essay responding to David Little’s analysis of self-defense as a foundation for human rights. In this first

“Big Brother and the New Ministry of Truth: How President Trump’s Executive Order May have Disastrous Consequences for Religious Freedom” by Kristina Arriaga

Last month, for the first time ever, Twitter fact-checked two presidential tweets. In response, President Donald Trump issued an executive order which would, in essence, eliminate a pillar of U.S. internet law, the protections contained in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA 230). CDA 230 gives interactive internet platforms immunity from many kinds

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” by Adrienne Phillips

“Sudan Criminalizes FGM” Adrienne Phillips Sudan recently criminalized female genital mutilation (FGM). According to the United Nations, about 87 percent of Sudanese women between the ages of fourteen and forty-nine have undergone some form of FGM. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that, worldwide, “more than 200 million girls and women alive today” have experienced

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part IV” by David Little

This is the final installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part III” by David Little

This is the third installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights – Part II” by David Little

This is the second installment of a four-part essay in which Dr. David Little develops a unified theory of human rights based upon the personal and collective right of self-defense. His central claim is that that key words in the Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights point to the right of self-defense “against

“I Swear to God: Oaths, Accommodations, and the Binding of Conscience” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“I Swear to God: Oaths, Accommodations, and the Binding of Conscience” Matthew P. Cavedon Watch any courtroom drama and you know something serious is about to happen when a witness takes an oath. In the typical Hollywood version, it goes like this: “Do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but

“REVIEW: Law and the Christian Tradition in Italy by Condorelli and Domingo”

Law and the Christian Tradition in Italy edited by Orazio Condorelli and Rafael Domingo Review by John Witte Jr. This volume is part of a 50-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History,” presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by

““God, Sometimes You Don’t Come Through”: The Presentation of Religious Trauma Syndrome Through Rock Music – Part III” by Maggie Parker

“Audience enjoying a concert” by Yvette de Wit / Wikimedia / CC0 1.0 This is the third installment of a three-part essay that explores the way in which rock musicians are using their music as a way of working through religious trauma. Through the exploration of the connection of Religious Trauma Syndrome to PTSD, the idea