“On Returning to Campus: What Might We Learn from Christian Ethics?” by Paul Lewis

Photo by Polina Zimmerman from Pexels COVID-19 presents colleges with precisely the kind of problem that those of us in the liberal arts claim that we are preparing people to address in responsible ways. The pandemic confronts us with what academics call an unstructured problem: one that has many layers and for which there is

“Great Christian Jurists in English History” edited by Mark Hill QC and Richard H. Helmholz

Great Christian Jurists in English History edited by Mark Hill QC and Richard H. Helmholz This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History”, presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the Center for the

“‘Losing Religion:’ Black Lives Matter, the Sacred, and the Secular” by Ari Colston

Photo by Nicole Baster on Unsplash In an interview with Krista Tippet’s theology podcast On Being, prominent civil rights activist and public theologian Ruby Sales considers the role of Black Christianity and Black folk religion in her community organizing. Despite being reared in the Black Baptist tradition, Sales explains that she “lost her religion” during

“Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue: The Free Exercise Clause Prevails” by Martha McCarthy

Photo of Supreme Court in Washington, D.C (Creative Commons/Public Domain) The Supreme Court delivered a precedent-setting decision on June 30, 2020, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue. The facts and holding of this case have already been addressed in the Canopy Forum, so I will only summarize them here. Then, following a brief discussion of

“Have We Gone Too Far By Tearing Down Religious Monuments?” by Adrienne Phillips

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Have We Gone Too Far By Tearing Down Religious Monuments?” Adrienne Phillips Religious statues and monuments are prominent cultural, historical, and ecclesiastical focal points around the world. People travel thousands of miles to view them, express their religious devotions, or just admire the beauty. Lately, there has been

“Great Christian Jurists in French History” by Olivier Descamps and Rafael Domingo

Great Christian Jurists in French History edited by Olivier Descamps and Rafael Domingo This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History, “presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the Center for the Study of