“Law and Christianity in Latin America: The Work of Great Jurists” edited by M.C. Mirow and Rafael Domingo

Law and Christianity in Latin America: The Work of Great Jurists edited by M.C. Mirow and Rafael Domingo This volume is part of a fifty-volume series on “Great Christian Jurists in World History, “presenting the interaction of law and Christianity through the biographies of 1000 legal figures of the past two millennia. Commissioned by the

“Holy Communion in the Church of England in light of the Coronavirus Pandemic” by Christopher Grout

Photo / James Coleman / Unsplash The coronavirus pandemic has had (and continues to have) worldwide implications. Quite apart from the tragic loss of life and the damage to economies, individuals have faced significant restrictions in their personal lives, which includes, but of course is not limited to, limitations on the extent to which they

“Two Tracks for Twelve Steps: Rehabilitation and Religious Liberty in Criminal Sentencing” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 Two Tracks for Twelve Steps: Rehabilitation and Religious Liberty in Criminal Sentencing Matthew P. Cavedon Right before Christmas 2019, a Canadian man won a settlement after his bosses made him attend Alcoholics Anonymous. Why? The man is an atheist, while the world-famous recovery program’s twelve steps require participants

“Self-Defense and Human Rights: David Little Responds Part 3”

Photo by Fermin Rodriguez Penelas on Unsplash This article is part of our “Self-Defense and Human Rights” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. As we continue the important conversation begun in early June with the publication of David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights, Dr. Little

“Self-Defense and Human Rights: David Little Responds Part 2”

Photo by Fermin Rodriguez Penelas on Unsplash This article is part of our “Self-Defense and Human Rights” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. As we continue the important conversation begun in early June with the publication of David Little’s The Right of Self-Defense and the Organic Unity of Human Rights, Dr. Little

“Last Rights? Death Chamber Chaplains and the Law” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Last Rights? Death Chamber Chaplains and the Law” Matthew P. Cavedon On December 22, 1849, twenty Russian dissidents stood on St. Petersburg square, waiting to be shot dead by their government. They had already been offered last rites. Several were even tied to a post. Suddenly, a messenger

“The Revolution in Freedoms of Press and Speech” by Wendell Bird

The Revolution in Freedoms of Press and Speech:From Blackstone to the First Amendment and Fox’s Libel ActWendell Bird This article is adapted from the introduction of the author’s new book: The Revolution in Freedoms of Press and Speech: From Blackstone to the First Amendment (Oxford University Press, 2020). The conventional view of the history of

“Ministerial Exceptions, Religious Exemptions, and Anti-Discrimination Legislation: Reciprocal Lessons from America and Australia” by Paul T. Babie

Image by Tom from Pixabay The recent Supreme Court decision in Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey-Berru and St. James School v. Biel (‘Morrissey-Berru’) has prompted a great deal of debate about the space made for freedom of religion or belief in anti-discrimination or equality legislation. The relevant space typically takes the form of an