“Reversing Course on Conciliation Clauses” by Ken Sande

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “Reversing Course on Conciliation Clauses” Ken Sande Although conciliation clauses (AKA, “religious arbitration clauses”) may be

“Who Arbitrates? Arbitrator Qualification Clauses in Religious Arbitration Agreements” by Michael A. Helfand

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “Who Arbitrates? Arbitrator Qualification Clauses in Religious Arbitration Agreements” Michael A. Helfand Religious arbitration is, at

“The Danger of “Anti-Sharia” Legislation to Religious Arbitration — And Not Just by Muslims” by Asma Uddin

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “The Danger of “Anti-Sharia” Legislation to Religious Arbitration — And Not Just by Muslims” Asma T.

“Two Conceptions of Anti-Establishment: When Should Courts Enforce Religious Arbitration Agreements?” by Brian Hutler

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “Two Conceptions of Anti-Establishment: When Should Courts Enforce Religious Arbitration Agreements?” Brian Hutler In previous work

“There is no First Amendment Exemption in Contracts Generally or in the Federal Arbitration Act: It Would Be Poor Policy (and Maybe Unconstitutional) to Have One.” by Michael J. Broyde

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “There is no First Amendment Exemption in Contracts Generally or in the Federal Arbitration Act: It

“‘Not a religion:’ Modern Hinduism and the Emergence of Hindutva” by Supriya Gandhi

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum and the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners who will examine the many religious traditions of South Asia and their diverse publics. Participation by invitation only. View selected videos and browse all essays here. ‘Not a religion:’ Modern Hinduism

“The Changing Terrain of Religious Freedom” by Heather J. Sharkey and Jeffrey Edward Green

The Changing Terrain of Religious Freedom edited by Heather J. Sharkey and Jeffrey Edward Green An overview by the editors What is religious freedom and how should we understand it? In recent years, scholars have taken impassioned stances in responding to this question. Writing from the perspective of U.S. history, one group of scholars has

“Why This Supreme Court Should Overrule Employment Division v. Smith” by Raphael A. Friedman

For several decades, parties asserting religious liberty claims under the Free Exercise Clause saw little success at the Supreme Court. Over the past few years, however, religious groups have fared better. Recently, they prevailed in cases challenging various restrictions imposed on houses of worship because of the COVID-19 pandemic. And in June, the Court ruled

“Ramirez v. Collier: Will the Supreme Court Expand the Right to the Presence of a Spiritual Advisor for Prisoners During Execution?” by Peter Wosnik

“Ramirez v. Collier: Will the Supreme Court Expand the Right to the Presence of a Spiritual Advisor for Prisoners During Execution?” Peter Wosnik In September 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a rare, eleventh-hour stay in an execution case for prisoner John Ramirez. Ramirez was convicted of stabbing a man to death during a robbery

“Why Secular Society Desperately Needs the Recognition of Religious Holidays” by Bruce Ledewitz

It is the common and traditional view that disputes over the recognition of religious holidays — disputes over creches and menorahs on public property, for example — are a clash between religious and secular citizens over the meaning of the Establishment Clause in the Constitution. But this is an outdated viewpoint, for two reasons. First,