“Hiding in Plain Sight: Christian Nationalism’s Threat to Faith Freedom for All” by Jennifer Hawks

The U.S. Constitution was enacted “in Order to form a more perfect Union,” and serves as the founding generation’s clarion call to all succeeding generations: The union isn’t perfect, and we must do our part to make it more so. When it comes to protecting religious freedom for all, that means building on the promise

“303 Creative v. Elenis: Masterpiece Cakeshop 2.0?” by Mark Satta

In fall 2017, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado. The key question was whether a Christian baker’s First Amendment free speech or religious free exercise rights permitted him to refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple in violation of Colorado’s Anti-Discrimination Act. The Court’s decision in June

“Power Imbalances and Abuse Dynamics in Christian Conciliation” by Daniel Teater

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “Power Imbalances and Abuse Dynamics in Christian Conciliation” Daniel Teater In Christian conciliation, the goal is

“Restricting Public Worship During Covid: The Response of Courts Across the Globe” by Mark Movsesian

A revealing episode For two years, governmental restrictions on communal worship during the Covid crisis have been a central issue on the law and religion agenda, drawing academic, judicial, and popular attention. Across the globe, governments responded to the pandemic by limiting religious meetings, as well as other public gatherings, in the interest of public

“The Future of Religious Arbitration in the U.S.” by Lee Ann Bambach

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “The Future of Religious Arbitration in the U.S.” Lee Ann Bambach Religious arbitration and dispute resolution

Power Imbalance in The Christian Conciliation Process by Ann Carey

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. Women, Power Imbalance and the Alternative Dispute Resolution Process Ann Carey The court litigation had spanned ten and

“Jehovah’s Witnesses and Religious Persecution: Do Signed Declarations Help?” by George D. Chryssides

On December 17, 2021, the U.S. Department of State’s Office of International Religious Freedom issued a joint statement on behalf of the International Religious Freedom and Belief Alliance (IRFBA), condemning the persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses in several countries, and calling on governments worldwide, inter alia, to release prisoners, end torture, home raids, all forms of

“The Loneliness of the Model Minority: Muslim Belonging in Malerkotla, Punjab” by Anna Bigelow

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum and the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners who will examine the many religious traditions of South Asia and their diverse publics. Participation by invitation only. View selected videos and browse all essays here. “The Loneliness of the Model

“Prayer is Everywhere” by Leslie Griffin

Prayer is everywhere. Everyone is disputing prayer, even though the First Amendment states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Or maybe the problem lies in the wording of the amendment itself. Establishment or free exercise? The Supreme Court has set numerous establishment clause tests, and

“Constitutional Recognition of Religious Exemptions to Vaccination Requirements” by James G. Hodge

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Supreme Court has demonstrated its willingness to intervene on critical questions of legal preparedness and response. Along the way, through two Presidential administrations and major shifts in the Court’s members, it has systematically reshaped core constitutional norms during the deadliest infectious disease crisis the nation has ever faced.  Reinterpreting