“‘Churches’ in a Time of Coronavirus” by Zachary B. Pohlman

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section D. Religious Organizations (Mark Movsesian, moderator) “‘Churches’ in a Time

“The COVID Crisis as a Crisis of Trust” by Brett G. Scharffs

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section E. Theological Implications/Reflections (Stephanie Barclay, moderator) “The COVID Crisis as

“Christian Public Engagement in a Time of Crisis” by Anton Sorkin

A virtual conference organized in partnership with Brigham Young University Law School, Emory University Law School, Notre Dame Law School, St. John’s University School of Law, and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. View the full video and browse all essays here. Section E. Theological Implications/Reflections (Stephanie Barclay, moderator) “Christian Public Engagement in

““God, Sometimes You Don’t Come Through”: The Presentation of Religious Trauma Syndrome Through Rock Music – Part III” by Maggie Parker

“Audience enjoying a concert” by Yvette de Wit / Wikimedia / CC0 1.0 This is the third installment of a three-part essay that explores the way in which rock musicians are using their music as a way of working through religious trauma. Through the exploration of the connection of Religious Trauma Syndrome to PTSD, the idea

““God, Sometimes You Don’t Come Through”: The Presentation of Religious Trauma Syndrome Through Rock Music – Part II” by Maggie Parker

“Audience enjoying a concert” by Yvette de Wit / Wikimedia CC0 This is the second installment of a three-part essay that explores the way in which rock musicians are using their music as a way of working through religious trauma. Through the exploration of the connection of Religious Trauma Syndrome to PTSD, the idea is that

“‘God, Sometimes You Don’t Come Through’: The Presentation of Religious Trauma Syndrome Through Rock Music – Part I” by Maggie Parker

“Audience enjoying a concert” by Yvette de Wit / Wikimedia CC0 This is the first installment of a three-part essay that explores the way in which rock musicians are using their music as a way of working through religious trauma. Through the exploration of the connection of Religious Trauma Syndrome to Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the

“‘Sunday Service,’ the Black Church, and Prophetic Religion in the Public Sphere” by Ari Colston

Kanye West performing at Lollapalooza in 2011 / Rodrigo Ferrari / Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0 In a chain of interrelated events, hip-hop artist Kanye West (referred to here as ‘Kanye’ to avoid confusion with scholar Cornel West) once again became a subject of public scrutiny when he met with and endorsed President Donald Trump, announced