“Denmark’s Provincial Bias against Foreign Religious Languages” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Denmark’s Provincial Bias against Foreign Religious Languages“ Matthew P. Cavedon Denmark has proposed a new law regulating religion. Under it, all sermons and homilies must be translated into Danish. This is being billed as a national security measure. It is also being attacked as a burden on small

““A Noble Alchemy”: Benefit of Clergy and the Early History of Leniency” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “‘A Noble Alchemy’: Benefit of Clergy and the Early History of Leniency” Matthew P. Cavedon Criminal justice reform efforts have recently focused on the consequences of having a record. There is a growing sense that society needs to show mercy to those who pay the consequences for doing

“Perfectionist Prophecy, Imperfect World” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Perfectionist Prophecy, Imperfect World” Matthew P. Cavedon I recently wrote about Patrick O’Neill, a Catholic activist convicted of vandalizing a nuclear submarine base. The number of connections I have to his case is so high that this article could almost just be my list of disclosures. Here it

“Vatican Criminal Reforms Ignore Glaring Problems Even as Jurisdiction Expands Worldwide” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Vatican Criminal Reforms Ignore Glaring Problems Even as Jurisdiction Expands Worldwide” Matthew P. Cavedon On February 16, Pope Francis announced changes to the Vatican’s criminal code. These alter court procedures to protect a few defense rights and make punishment more merciful. They come alongside recent expansions in the

“Which King’s Bay? Religion against the Rules in Nuclear Civil Disobedience” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Which King’s Bay? Religion against the Rules in Nuclear Civil Disobedience” Matthew P. Cavedon It is commonplace to understand religion as a building block of identity. We define our personalities in light of any number of characteristics – our religion, nationality, politics, ethnicity, sex, disabilities, and so on.

“Subjective Beliefs, Social Judgments, and Witch Killers” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Subjective Beliefs, Social Judgments, and Witch Killers” Matthew P. Cavedon In a 1992 abortion decision, Casey v. Planned Parenthood, a plurality of the U.S. Supreme Court held: “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and

“Opening the Doors to Perception” By Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Opening the Doors to Perception” Matthew P. Cavedon This past Election Day saw a shift in the treatment of psychedelics, with voters in Oregon and the District of Columbia legalizing their use. This comes a year after Denver decriminalized them. Psychedelics’ ability to alter perceptions of reality –

“Practicing (and) Catholic” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Practicing (and) Catholic” Matthew P. Cavedon Sai Santosh Kumar Kolluru recently reflected for Canopy Forum on how Hindu beliefs and practices inform his service as a lawyer. His writing inspired me to put down some thoughts on the relationship between Catholic theology and my own practice as a

“Free Speakers, Restrained Hearers: Blasphemy’s Legal Evolution” by Matthew P. Cavedon

Image adapted from Wikicommons by DhLeaks44 / CC BY-SA 4.0 “Free Speakers, Restrained Hearers: Blasphemy’s Legal Evolution“ Matthew P. Cavedon The most infamous terror trial in modern France began in September. Five years ago, Islamist terrorists shot nearly two dozen people at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical magazine. The publication had drawn their ire by reprinting