“Equality or Need: A Theological Look at the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Tax Plans (Part 3)” by Allen Calhoun

—Part III—  Parts I and II of this article surveyed the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates’ tax proposals, particularly those (like the wealth tax proposals) that seek to reduce economic inequality, and located those proposals in the history of tax philosophy. This Part III places that largely post-Enlightenment philosophy of taxation in dialogue with the longer

“Islam and Women’s Rights: Postcolonial Challenges” by Shannon Dunn

This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s formation of the Commission on Unalienable Rights has generated controversy among human rights advocates, in part because of the possibility that

“Equality or Need: A Theological Look at the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Tax Plans (Part 2)” by Allen Calhoun

—Part II—  Part I of this article surveyed the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates’ tax plans and situated proposals for raising revenue and reducing the wealth gap in broader tax policy concerns. The proposals are revisiting two questions dormant since the early 1980s: (1) how should tax policy balance the dual concerns of equity and efficiency;

“Equality or Need: A Theological Look at the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Tax Plans (Part 1)” by Allen Calhoun

—Part I— Many Christian theologians of  the past two thousand years would likely have supported a wealth tax, but not for the reasons given by the current Democratic presidential candidates. Using the tax system to redistribute resources from the wealthy to the poor has been a matter of controversy in American history, but it has

“A Natural Law for Queer and Racial Justice” by Craig Ford

Image by Robert Jones from Pixabay This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. In this brief essay, I propose that the natural law and social justice traditions can together form a powerful partnership that champions anti-racist, anti-sexist, and anti-homophobic causes.

“Standing Rock: Law, Religion, and Morality in Contested Spaces” by Kamil Jamil

“Sacred Stone Camp” by Tony Webster / Flickr / CC BY 2.0 The Standing Rock demonstrations, which began in early 2016 and lasted almost a year, have been aptly characterized as the largest Native American activist movement in modern history. More than 300 tribes and scores of water protectors gathered to protest against the construction

“Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Nonhuman Environment” by Dana Lloyd

Cover Image: Mouth of the Klamath River on the Pacific Ocean, Del Norte County, California / Wikimedia. This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. The Trump Administration’s new Commission on Unalienable Rights, recently convened

“Should Courts Care if a Juror Thinks She Might Burn in Hell?” by Nathaniel Romano

“Arms-Fold” by Dorset Photographic is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0  On September 12, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit granted habeas corpus relief to William Barnes, who had been previously sentenced to death in North Carolina. The basis for the court’s ruling was the fact that during deliberations at trial, a juror relied on

“The Many Voices of Human Rights” by Linda Hogan

Miquel Barceló’s ceiling at the UN headquarters in Geneva. United States Mission Geneva / CC BY-ND 2.0 This essay continues our series of pieces exploring the relationship between Natural Law and Human Rights in light of the State Department’s recently convened Commission on Unalienable Rights. The Commission on Unalienable Rights has already generated significant criticism,