“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion” by Matthew P. Cavedon

“Conviction: A Series on Criminal Law and Religion”Matthew P. Cavedon “conviction (n) 1: the act or process of finding a person guilty of a crime especially in a court of law 2a:a strong persuasion or belief” Canopy Forum is an online publication on the intersection of  law and religion, and Conviction is Canopy Forum’s ongoing series

“Subsidiarity and Abolition: On the Privatization of Prisons and the Demands of Justice” by Mauricio Najarro

“Freedom” by Marko Lovric / Pixabay In October 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill meant to ban the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, phasing out existing detention facilities entirely by 2028. Already contested by means of a complaint filed by GEO Group, a private prison management corporation, and a lawsuit filed by

“COVID-19: Why the Balance Between Freedom of Religion and Public Health Matters” by Paul T. Babie & Charles J. Russo

As COVID-19 tightens its lethal grip on the globe, a palpable tension emerges between the authority of governmental officials in every state in the U.S. who have issued guidelines limiting social interactions to preserve the public health while recognizing religious exemptions, and individual rights to freedom of religion. Lawsuits in the United States have challenged

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part II” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the second part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part I” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the first part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal