“The Case of the Sheitel: How Jewish Law Accommodates, Even on Cultural Matters, to Reduce Systemic Tension” by Michael J. Broyde

Image: Wedding celebration, Jerusalem 1981 / Drkup(IMJ) / CC BY-SA 4.0 This article is part of our “Clothed in Religion: Law and Religious Attire/Garb” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. One of the most interesting social developments in Jewish legal and cultural interactions with Western society is the sheitel,

“Law, Religion & Abortion Law of the United States: A Jewish View” by Michael J. Broyde

This article is part of our “Kennedy, Carson, and Dobbs: Law and Religion in Pressing Supreme Court Cases” series. If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Note: This work is a profoundly revised version intended to be accessible to a secular audience of a recent article of mine with a

“There is no First Amendment Exemption in Contracts Generally or in the Federal Arbitration Act: It Would Be Poor Policy (and Maybe Unconstitutional) to Have One” by Michael J. Broyde

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “There is no First Amendment Exemption in Contracts Generally or in the Federal Arbitration Act: It

“Halloween in Jewish Law: Religious and Cultural Transformation” by Michael J. Broyde

A number of years ago, I wrote an article addressing celebrating Thanksgiving according to Jewish law, which was published in Canopy Forum last year. In that article, I noted that most Jewish law authorities accept that: (1) Thanksgiving is an American holiday with secular origins, (2) While some people might celebrate Thanksgiving with religious rituals, this

“Fixed Terms for Justices Will Not Fix the Confirmation Controversies” by Michael J. Broyde

This article is part of our “Notorious ACB: Law, Religion, and Justice Barrett’s Ascent to the Court” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. At every confirmation of a Supreme Court Justice, inevitably, commentators appear advocating 18-year term limits for Supreme Court Justices, under the assumption that regular and scheduled

“Thanksgiving and Traditional Jewish Life: Celebrating American Holidays and Jewish Law” by Michael J. Broyde

Introduction This short posting on what the Jewish tradition has to say about Thanksgiving will strike some as surprising — so a word of background might be helpful. Traditional Jews do not celebrate holidays of another religion and have always shied away from even nominally secular holidays that are really about another religion, such as

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part III” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the final installment of a three-part essay, offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders, given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part II” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the second part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal

“How Should an Ethical Prosecutor Act if the Jails are Unsafe? Lessons from Jewish Law – Part I” by Michael J. Broyde

This is the first part of a three-part essay offering a radical proposal for how ethical prosecutors ought to approach sentencing recommendations for non-violent criminal offenders given the often dangerous and abusive conditions that exist in many American prisons. This perspective is informed by Jewish law’s complex history and jurisprudence criticizing cooperation with unjust legal