“Selling Religious Cures and Other First Amendment Pitfalls in the Age of Coronavirus” by Shlomo Pill

Challenging times can bring out the very best in people, but these times also seem to prompt far less commendable actions by others. There are always those happy and eager to take advantage of a crisis, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is no exception. Alongside stories of generosity and courage, there are reports of price

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 3)” by Shlomo C. Pill

Parliament of the World’s Religions, Chicago, United States, 1893. Wikimedia. Part three of this series on interfaith dialogue focuses on religious literacy. Religious illiteracy is a widespread phenomenon and can seriously hamper attempts to engage in at least some forms of interfaith dialogue.  Notably, this problem is not exclusively one of interfaith illiteracy as many

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 2)” by Shlomo C. Pill

Parliament of the World’s Religions, Chicago, United States, 1893. Wikimedia. Part two of this three-part series on interfaith dialogue explains several different forms of interfaith dialogue, highlighting some of the benefits and limitations of each, and explores the relevance of religious and interfaith literacy as an important tool for effective interfaith dialogue. [Read Part I here]

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 1)” by Shlomo C. Pill

This is the first part of a three-part series exploring some of the methods, possibilities, and skills needed to effectively engage in interfaith dialogue and activity. History of Interfaith Engagement Interfaith engagement is hardly a new phenomenon. The most basic kind of interfaith activity—what is often referred to as “the dialogue of everyday life”—has been

“More, Not Less, Religion May Be a Cure for America’s Political Ills” by Shlomo C. Pill

Note: This and other essays in this series were originally delivered as part of the Leadership and Multifaith Program symposium on Law, Religious Identity, and Public Discourse held at Georgia Tech on September 26, 2019. I agree with much of Judge Dhanidina’s rather dour diagnosis of our current societal ills.  We are indeed currently experiencing a crisis