“The Theological and the Political in Christianity, Socialism, and Modernity” by Gary Dorrien

Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer were theological titans of the twentieth century who naturally wrote mostly about the interpretation of Christian doctrines. That they remain relevant to social ethics and political theology cannot be assumed; such a claim must be defended. Both theologians might seem to be prime candidates for the verdict that too much

“Public Health, Public Trust, and Faith Communities” by Michael J. DeBoer

In a recently issued report, the RAND Corporation highlighted a dimension of the impact that the government response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had on trust. It noted that trust in the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) declined significantly between May and October 2020, and it observed that

“At Home and Among ‘Heathens'” by Matthew J. Cressler

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Winnifred Fallers Sullivan open their edited volume At Home and Abroad: The Politics of American Religion (Columbia University Press, 2020) with an epigraph: Is it, perhaps, possible that there are two kinds of Civilization—one for home consumption and one for the heathen market? – Mark Twain, “To the Person Sitting in Darkness”

“The Corpus Mysticum and Church Freedom: A Response to Edward David” by James Pennell

De Vries, Paul Vredeman. “Interior of a Gothic Cathedral,” 1612. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, https://collections.lacma.org/node/229641. This article is in response to Edward David’s recent article in Canopy. From a theological perspective, Christians should welcome Edward David’s critical reflections on Lockean liberalism’s eschewal of a corporate understanding of the Church as corpus mysticum. For

“Secular Corporations, Religious Subjects” by Isaac A. Weiner

What is a religious corporation? After a number of high profile U.S. Supreme Court decisions over the past decade, this question has assumed great significance as the religious corporation has come to occupy a powerful space of exemption in U.S. law. The “ministerial exception,” for example, as elaborated in Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School

“The Bishops, President Biden, and American Catholic Politicians: An Uneasy Relationship” by Charles J. Russo

Historical Context A timely, significant topic of discussion worth remembering, stretching back to presidential candidate John F. Kennedy’s battle against anti-Catholic prejudice, is the relationship between politicians and their faith leaders. This relationship, particularly involving politicians who are Roman Catholic, is the focus of this article. In his September 12, 1960, campaign speech in Texas

“Why Corporate Religious Exemptions Are Not Corporate Social Responsibility” by Elizabeth Sepper and James D. Nelson

In academic and legal debates, we frequently hear that the tradition of corporate social responsibility (CSR) supports religious exemptions for business corporations. As Justice Alito wrote in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, if corporations may pursue various socially responsible objectives — such as adhering to strict environmental standards or providing exemplary working conditions — then “there