“Precedent in Doubt?: Brown v. Board of Education in Recent Judicial Confirmations” by M. Christian Green

Cover Image: Little Rock Nine Memorial. Little Rock, AR. Wikimedia Commons. We have witnessed a curious pattern emerging in many recent confirmation hearings for federal judicial nominees. Beginning first with the Senate confirmation hearings of nominee Wendy Vitter, recently appointed to a federal judgeship in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of

“Three Myths about Religion and Politics” (Part 3) by Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

This is Part 3 of a three-part series in which Elizabeth Shakman Hurd evaluates three common myths about U.S. foreign religion politics and policy. Read Part 1 and Part 2 here. Myth #3: Exceptionalism, American-style: Freedom at home, establishment abroad. The First Amendment of the US Constitution reads in part: “Congress shall make no law

“Three Myths about Religion and Politics” (Part 2) by Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

This is Part 2 of a three-part series in which Elizabeth Shakman Hurd evaluates three common myths about U.S. foreign religion politics and policy. Read Part 1 here. Myth #2: Religion used to be ignored in international affairs but it has returned. Things are looking up. Flourishing government religion bureaucracies reflect this coming to terms

“Three Myths about Religion and Politics” (Part 1) by Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Americans are often told that the U.S. government and its allies are working to stamp out the forces of intolerance around the world by promoting religious freedom and combatting violent extremism. I’ve always been baffled by these assertions. What do they mean? What does this look like in practice? My book Beyond Religious Freedom is

A New Direction in Law and Religion

Welcome to Canopy Forum! Law and religion are two of the most complex and pervasive forces in human history.  These two “different but interrelated … dimensions of social experience” continue to shape the lives of individuals and communities around the world. The mission of Canopy Forum is to foster deeper understandings of law, religion, and

“What’s the Story with the First U.S. Court Case on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting?” by Kristina Arriaga

United States v. Nagarwala should have marked the beginning of the end for female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in the United States. Instead, after two contentious years in court, the case unraveled when a federal judge dismissed most of the charges against the defendants. In his 28-page ruling, District Judge Bernard A. Friedman ruled that Congress had exceeded its

“Moral Leadership: A Vocation For the Next Generation” by Robert M. Franklin

“Spiritual, but not religious” summarizes the religious orientation of many younger Americans.  For years, those who care about theological education have puzzled over the declining interest by new college graduates in parish ministry and pastoral leadership. It has been a time of disruption and heartburn.  If future generations are likely to be less interested in