“Immigration and Religious Identity in American Law” by Adina Jocelyn Langer

Note: This and other essays in this series were originally delivered as part of the Leadership and Multifaith Program symposium on Law, Religious Identity, and Public Discourse held at Georgia Tech on September 26, 2019. In my work as the curator of the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE) at Kennesaw State University, I

“More, Not Less, Religion May Be a Cure for America’s Political Ills” by Shlomo C. Pill

Note: This and other essays in this series were originally delivered as part of the Leadership and Multifaith Program symposium on Law, Religious Identity, and Public Discourse held at Georgia Tech on September 26, 2019. I agree with much of Judge Dhanidina’s rather dour diagnosis of our current societal ills.  We are indeed currently experiencing a crisis

“Keeping the Faith: What Secular Law Has Taught Me About Religion” by Halim Dhanidina

Note: This and other essays in this series were originally delivered as part of the Leadership and Multifaith Program symposium on Law, Religious Identity, and Public Discourse held at Georgia Tech on September 26, 2019. There is a current crisis of confidence in our democracy and secular institutions.  We have seen a simultaneous dwindling of

“Muslim Americans and Citizenship: Between the Ummah and the USA” by Saeed A. Khan

Can an individual truly be a citizen of a nation and simultaneously a global citizen? For the 1.8 million Muslims of the world, and especially the estimated 4 million in the United States, the question is deeper than simple political allegiance; it goes to the core of belonging and self-perception. Citizenship, whether as a political