“Why ‘School Choice’ is a Strange Term: Educational Pluralism and International Norms” by Ashley Rogers Berner

Why ‘School Choice’ is a Strange Term: Educational Pluralism and International NormsAshley Rogers Berner The following is an excerpt from Ashley Rogers Berner’s new book, Educational Pluralism and Democracy, Reprinted with permission from Harvard Education Press. The United States needs a new conversation about education. Few areas of American life have experienced more conflict of

“Religion in State Education Policy” by Bryan Kelley

“In God We Trust” Plaque by USCapitol (CC0). Every year, state legislatures throughout the country introduce legislation that in some way brings together religion and the public education system. This is perhaps becoming more common, as state policymakers recognize the increasingly favorable precedents being put in place by the Supreme Court regarding the presence of

“Faculty Unions in Catholic Educational Institutions: A Disconnect between Church Teachings and Practice” by Charles J. Russo

Approaching Vatican City, Rome by Fenous (CC BY-SA 4.0). Speaking in the Vatican to a gathering of the Italian General Confederation of Labor on December 19, 2022, Pope Francis eloquently proclaimed “there are no free workers without unions.” Francis affirmed the long-standing labor teachings of the Roman Catholic Church, which began in 1891 with Pope

“Carson v. Makin and the Blossoming of Religious Freedom in Education” by Charles J. Russo

Picture by Wokandapix on Pixabay. This article is part of our “Kennedy, Carson, and Dobbs: Law and Religion in Pressing Supreme Court Cases” series. If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Notwithstanding the fears of the Supreme Court’s critics, who suggest that it intends to eliminate public education by providing

“A ‘Revolutionized’ Supreme Court Term” by Steven K. Green

Picture by Patrick Fore on Unsplash. This article is part of our “Kennedy, Carson, and Dobbs: Law and Religion in Pressing Supreme Court Cases” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. The Supreme Court’s Term in 1991-1992 promised to be highly consequential. Two hot-button issues were on the Court’s docket

“The Supreme Court Says Conscience is Everything. Or Nothing. It Depends.” by Len Niehoff

US Supreme Court by John L. Marino. This article is part of our “Kennedy, Carson, and Dobbs: Law and Religion in Pressing Supreme Court Cases” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. The Supreme Court has long recognized the individual human conscience as sacred territory. One of the most famous

“Two Conceptions of Anti-Establishment: When Should Courts Enforce Religious Arbitration Agreements?” by Brian Hutler

A virtual conference sponsored by Canopy Forum of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory (CSLR) featuring scholars, experts and practitioners on the topic of religious arbitration. View the full video and browse all essays here. “Two Conceptions of Anti-Establishment: When Should Courts Enforce Religious Arbitration Agreements?” Brian Hutler In previous work

“Why This Supreme Court Should Overrule Employment Division v. Smith” by Raphael A. Friedman

Photo of the Village Church of Lincolnshire by Andrew Seaman on Unsplash. For several decades, parties asserting religious liberty claims under the Free Exercise Clause saw little success at the Supreme Court. Over the past few years, however, religious groups have fared better. Recently, they prevailed in cases challenging various restrictions imposed on houses of

“Religious Tests, Religious Freedom, and ‘Animus’ and ‘Bigotry’ at the Supreme Court” by M. Christian Green

Photo by David Veksler on Unsplash This article is part of our “Notorious ACB: Law, Religion, and Justice Barrett’s Ascent to the Court” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. The No Religious Test Clause within Article VI, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution is a special text in