Interactions Podcast

Interactions Podcast

The Interactions podcast, a podcast about the interactions between law and religion, is produced by the CSLR and distributed by Canopy Forum. Listen wherever you get your podcasts for article reads, roundtable discussions, and expert analysis.

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New Course on Restorative Justice

New Course on Restorative Justice

In this series of lectures, James W. McCarty delves into restorative justice as a dynamic global social movement seeking to transform harm. This course navigates the depths of encounter, dialogue, and storytelling as powerful tools of rehumanization.

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The Roles of Law, Religion and Housing

The Roles of Law, Religion and Housing

This virtual conference and essay series explores global challengs of homelessness, housing policy and housing vulenerability. Read new essays by a diverse set of thinkers here.

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“Selling Religious Cures and Other First Amendment Pitfalls in the Age of Coronavirus” by Shlomo Pill

Photo by Anna Shvets (Pixels CC) This article is part of our “Reflecting on COVID-19” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Challenging times can bring out the very best in people, but these times also seem to prompt far less commendable actions by others. There are always those happy and

“Becoming Black and Christian in Virginia” by Ariela Gross and Alejandro de le Fuente

This article is part of our “Race, Religion, and Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. This article is adapted from the authors’ forthcoming book: Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana (2020) from Cambridge University Press. By the time the English settled Virginia in

“Religious Racism: An Overlooked Form of Anti-Black Prejudice” by Danielle Boaz

Image of Religious Ceremony/ by Andrè Mellagi/ Flickr / This article is part of our “Race, Religion, and Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. Last August, DECRADI (a specialized police force in Rio de Janeiro that handles crimes of religious and racial intolerance) announced that since the beginning of

“Why Does the Catholic Church Insist on Celibacy?” by Rafael Domingo

Pixabay (License) An earlier Spanish-language version of this essay was recently published on CNN en Español. Recently, the Catholic Church has begun an internal conversation about ordaining married men as priests. This move would mark a significant change from what has been the settled policy of the Latin Church for a thousand years, under which

“Public Rhetoric, Human Nature, and Human Rights” by Mathew D. Garcia Scruggs

Pixabay (License) Natural law and human rights language is directly connected to discussions about human nature. Public rhetoric describing specific communities often shapes our discussions about the way natural law and human rights are applied to those communities. Given the current U.S. presidential administration’s public rhetoric about Latinx and undocumented communities, it is important to

“Teshuva: A Look at Repentance, Forgiveness, and Atonement in Jewish Law and Philosophy and American Legal Thought” by Samuel J. Levine

Photo of red flowers by FanDeLy (Pixabay CC) This article is part of our “Religious Reflections on Forgiveness in Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. This essay is excerpted from Samuel J. Levine, Teshuva: A Look at Repentance, Forgiveness and Atonement in Jewish Law and Philosophy and American Legal

“Acknowledging the Moral Courage of Refugees and Responding in Kind” by Jason Grubbs

Pixabay (License) During a speech at the United Nations on September 23, 2019, President Trump stated that “protecting religious freedom is one of my highest priorities.”  This claim, however, has some advocates of threatened religious minorities crying foul. They argue that Trump has not made good on his promise, citing his ever-shrinking limit on the

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 3)” by Shlomo C. Pill

Parliament of the World’s Religions, Chicago, United States, 1893. Wikimedia. Part three of this series on interfaith dialogue focuses on religious literacy. Religious illiteracy is a widespread phenomenon and can seriously hamper attempts to engage in at least some forms of interfaith dialogue.  Notably, this problem is not exclusively one of interfaith illiteracy as many

“Law, Justice, Mercy, and Forgiveness from a Catholic Perspective” by Robert Fastiggi

Photo by James Coleman on Unsplash (License) This article is part of our “Religious Reflections on Forgiveness in Law” series.If you’d like to check out other articles in this series, click here. From a Catholic perspective, law, justice, mercy, and forgiveness ultimately converge in God, who is the ultimate source of law and combines justice, mercy, and forgiveness in

“Religious Literacy and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue (Part 2)” by Shlomo C. Pill

Parliament of the World’s Religions, Chicago, United States, 1893 (Wikimedia) (Public Domain). Part two of this three-part series on interfaith dialogue explains several different forms of interfaith dialogue, highlighting some of the benefits and limitations of each, and explores the relevance of religious and interfaith literacy as an important tool for effective interfaith dialogue. [Read Part